The Wargaming Society
Quarterly Dispatch
1 April 2019

Greetings from Headquarters,

Time marches on... This is our third Quarterly dispatch. Our hope is that you will find it interesting and imformative as the others. If you have an interest in submitting articles, ideas, or requests for future dispatches, please send an email to one of the TWS Founders...

Aloysius Kling Sr - al@wargamingsoiciety.com
Mark Jones - foundermark@wargamingsociety.com
Scott Clawson - founderscott@wargamingsociety.com

Our main focus at TWS has been, and always will be, having fun. We leave our conflicts on the computer battlefields and, for the most part, this has been successfully accomplished. We do not require the use of any House Rules as these can lead to disagreements and arguments. Our tournaments are based only on the Optional Rules which are already built into the games that we play.

Wargaming Society Tournaments

We have extended the end date for Round 1 and Round 2 of our Age of Napoleon Eckmühl Battle Brigade Tournament. The overall end date of the tournament is now 15 April 2019...

Battle of Eylau Tournament

We are in the process of planning several future tournaments for TWS.. Our special Eylau Tournament starting immediately after the games release is to celebrate the new JTS Eylau-Friedland Campaign game. This tournament will be a single scenario: The Battle of Eylau (056_Eylau_H_HTH.scn) 80 turns... This tournament is one scenario with the victory going to who ever scores the most victory points... Participants will be matched up as they sign up for the tournament... The first La Grande Armée member will be matched to the first Coaltion member that signs up... The second LGA member will be matched to the second Coation member and so on... This way as participating members are matched they can start their individual games right away... No waiting for everyone to be matched up...

Once again JTS is supporting this event with a game of your choice to a participant in this tournament who play at leaset 30 turns... In addition to this we are also giving away 3 books... Prizes will be drawn at random...

Eylau Tournament Web Page: http://wargamingsociety.com/napol/tournaments/eylau/eylautourny.html

Let the Battles Begin!

Eylau-Friedland Tournament

We are also going to have another Eylau-Friedland Tournament Fall of 2019... The fall tournament will be a three round affair... Scoring will be as follows: Scoring will be based strictly on the final Victory Level achieved, with the points being awarded as follows: Major Victory - 4 Points, Minor Victory - 3 Points, Draw - 2 Points, Minor Defeat - 1 Point & Major Defeat - 0 Points. There will be three rounds of play with a scenario being played from both sides of the battlefield. Points will be awarded for each game in each round. If you manage to win a Major Victory in all six games, you could aquire 24 Tournament Victory Points... In the event that we have a tie after three rounds of play, we will add a fourth playoff round.

Once again JTS is supporting this event with a game of your choice to a participant in this tournament who play at least 50% of the turns in all three rounds... In addition to this we are also giving away 2 books... Prizes will be drawn at random...

Eylau-Friedland Tournament Web Page: http://wargamingsociety.com/napol/tournaments/aon2019/aon2019.html

Not a Member of the Wargaming Society

If you would like to participate in the Battle of Eylau Tournament of the fall 2019 Eylau-Friedland Tournament and are not a member... You can join the Wargaming Society and sign up for the tournament.. Check out our various Age of Napoleon Armies and find a regiment you would like to command... Interest in other eras... You can join more the one...

Visit: http://www.wargamingsociety.com/joinsociety/wgsenlist.htm

ACW Chickamauga Tournament

This tournament is far from over and Round 2 starts 4 April 2019... We have had some issues with our scenario selection in Round 1 and have made some changes to correct it in Rounds 2 and 3...

In addition to this we will be playing with the Optional Melee Resolution turned on!!!

Chickamauga Tournament Web Page: http://wargamingsociety.com/amcw/tournaments/acw2019/acw2019.html

ACW Fall Tournament

If you have a game and/or scenario selections for the ACW Fall Tournament please send them to any of the founders or all three of us... We are planning on a 1 October 2019 start date and ending 2020... There is some controversy on using the Melee Optional ResolutionRule On... Please let us know if you would like this on in future tournaments... We await your suggestions...

Please post your responses in the TWS/ACW Forum on the ACW Fall Tournament Suggestions post so that all our members can see the input from all those replying...

My Thoughts on Tournament Participation - Aloysius Kling Sr

The Wargaming Society tournaments are for all of our members to have fun and make new friends... While some win more than others and things do not always seem fair...

Well, life isn't fair!

Even while loosing a game you can still have fun by winning a little victory in the game... I recently played a game with Roy Purcell against Bill Cann and Mark Jones... Going into this game Roy and I knew we had a tough fight ahead of us... Well in this game I surprised Mark Jones with an unexpeted attack... I beat up his forces and slowed his advance... Yes we still lost the battle, but I did have some fun surprising Mark... My point is you can still have a good time, even losing a game...

In tournaments playing the game even when you are loosing is important to your opponent and to the other members participating in the tournament... If you drop out, or just do not play your turns in a timely manner, you are being very unfair to the person you are playing against... I would say this is not a good way to make friends... So, if you sign up for a tournament, play the cards dealt and have fun... You can still win a game or book...

Enjoying Multiplayer Games - Bill Reaves

As many of you already know, multiplayer games can be very entertaining and rewarding. I am a veteran of many multiplayer games, and I want to pass on some tips and advice to make our hobby even more enjoyable. If you have not yet tried a multiplayer game and want to see what it's like, I urge you to register your interest in our Forum.

One of the great joys of multiplayer gaming is the opportunity to meet people from many different countries. Since you will be corresponding more frequently than in a head-to-head game it is very important to establish good communications between friends and foes alike. Resolve any issues early. Clear communications are vital to any campaign!

It is important to allow for the extra time that a multiplayer game will take since the the turns have to make more rounds among the players. This requires commitment and perseverance from all the players to keep the game running smoothly. Too many multiplayer games have failed because of slow response or no response from one or more of the players. I suggest players inquire after a set time (3-4 days, whatever) if no response has come from a player. It is o.k. to take breaks because we all know that real life can intervene at any time; just keep in touch with your mates. It is easy to get burnt out in the longer games, especially if you are losing badly (I know from experience). Please remember the point of all this is to enjoy the game and have fun; it should never become tedious or a chore for anyone. It always helps to keep a dialog going among the players.

As I am a Battle Brigade commander, please contact me if you have any questions about multiplayer gaming.

All the best,

Bill Reaves

The Victoria Cross and Canadian Recipient Citations - Bill Cann

I have decided that my Quarterly Reports for 2019 will focus on the general theme of the Victoria Cross and more specifically of selected citations for Canadians who won the VC during different conflicts between 1890-1945. For anyone who has not watched the 58 minute BBC documentary The Victoria Cross: For Valour, I highly recommend it as an informative and poignant overview. In September 1944 at the Battle of Arnhem, Major Cain won what was described as the "finest Victoria Cross of the whole war". Telling his story, along with other personal accounts of staggering bravery, Jeremy Clarkson looks at the history of the highest military decoration awarded for valour in the face of the enemy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tpg6h16k8eU

During the Boer War (1899-1902) four Canadians were awarded the Victoria. Here are their award citations followed by a brief biography.

“Lieutenant H.Z.C. Cockburn

with a handful of men at the most critical moment, held off the Boers to allow the guns to get away. To do so he had to sacrifice himself and his party, all of whom were either killed, wounded or taken prisoner, he himself being slightly wounded.” Hampden Zane Churchill Cockburn was born in Toronto, Ontario on 19 November 1867. After studying at Upper Canada College and the University of Toronto, he became a barrister. During the South African War, Cockburn served in South Africa with the Royal Canadian Dragoons. On 7 November 1900, at Liliefontein, near the Komati River, a large force of Boer commandos sought to encircle a retreating British column whose rearguard comprised two troops of Royal Canadian Dragoons and two 12-pounder guns of “D” Battery, Royal Canadian Field Artillery. At one point, the remnant of Lieutenant Cockburn’s troop of Dragoons fought desperately against 200 Boers who were intent on capturing “D” Battery’s two guns. His handful of men successfully held off the Boers, thus allowing the guns to escape, but all became casualties, including Cockburn who was slightly wounded. For his part in saving the guns, Lieutenant Cockburn received the Victoria Cross, one of three awarded for separate incidents in this action. Cockburn died in Grayburn, Saskatchewan on 12 July 1913.

“Lieutenant R.E.W. Turner.

Later in the day when the Boers again seriously threatened to capture the guns, Lieutenant Turner, although twice previously wounded, dismounted and deployed his men at close quarters and drove off the Boers, thus saving the guns.” Richard Ernest William Turner was born on 25 July 1871 in Quebec City, Quebec. When the South African War began in 1899, he was a second lieutenant in the Militia and immediately joined The Royal Canadian Dragoons. As well as the Victoria Cross, Turner received the Distinguished Service Order for his service during the conflict. On 7 November 1900, at Liliefontein, near the Komati River, a large force of Boer commandos sought to encircle a retreating British column whose rearguard comprised two troops of Royal Canadian Dragoons and two 12-pounder guns of “D” Battery, Royal Canadian Field Artillery. While commanding one of the troops of the Dragoons, Turner had already been wounded, and was retiring in front of the strong Boer assault when he received word that “D” Battery’s guns were in danger of being captured. He positioned a dozen of his troopers to ambush the attacking enemy. The successful execution of the ambush saved the guns and earned the Victoria Cross for Turner, one of three awarded for separate incidents in this action Turner again served overseas with the Canadian Expeditionary Force during the First World War, commanding first the 3rd Infantry Brigade and later the 2nd Division. Eventually promoted to the rank of lieutenant-general, he commanded Canadian forces in Britain, before becoming Chief of the General Staff, Overseas Military Forces of Canada. Turner died in Quebec City, Quebec, on 19 June 1961.

“Sergeant E. Holland

did splendid work with his Colt gun and kept the Boers off the two 12-pdrs by thus firing at close range, When he saw the enemy were too near for him to escape with the carriage, as the horse was blown, he calmly lifted the gun and galloped away with it under his arm.” Edward James Gibson Holland was born in Ottawa, Ontario on 2 February 1878, and as a young man joined the 5th Princess Louise Dragoon Guards of the Milita. After the beginning of the South African War (1899-1902) he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Dragoons. On 7 November 1900, at Liliefontein, near the Komati River, a large force of Boer commandos sought to encircle a retreating British column whose rearguard comprised two troops of Royal Canadian Dragoons and two 12-pounder guns of “D” Battery, Royal Canadian Field Artillery. Sergeant Holland was in charge of a Colt machine gun firing between the two 12-pounders, helping to hold off the Boers. When his machine gun jammed, Holland calmly disconnected the hot barrel, ran and captured a horse, and rode away with the gun under his arm. For his part in saving the 12-pounders and denying the use of his machine gun to the enemy, Sergeant Holland was awarded the Victoria Cross, one of three awarded for separate incidents in this action. After he returned to Canada Holland received a commission as an officer in his old Militia unit, the 5th Princess Louise Dragoon Guards. During the First World War he commanded a Motor Machine Gun Battery, serving in France with the Canadian Expeditionary Force for one year. Holland died on 18 June 1948 in Cobalt, Ontario.

“Sergeant A.H.L. Richardson.

On the 5th July, 1900, at Wolve Spruit, about 15 miles north of Standerton, a party of Lord Strathcona’s Corps, only 38 in number, came into contact, and was engaged at close quarters, with a force of 80 of the enemy. When the order to retire had been given, Sergeant Richardson rode back under a very heavy cross-fire and picked up a trooper whose horse had been shot and who was wounded in two places and rode with him out of fire. At the time when this act of gallantry was performed, Sergeant Richardson was within 300 yards of the enemy, and was himself riding a wounded horse.” Arthur Herbert Lindsay Richardson was born in Southport, England on 23 September 1873. In 1894, he came to Canada and joined the North West Mounted Police. When the South African War began in 1899, Richardson obtained leave from the Mounted Police to enlist in Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians), a regiment that was being raised for service in the conflict. Sergeant Richardson earned the Victoria Cross on 5 July 1900 at Wolve Spruit, near Standarton in South Africa. When he spotted a wounded Canadian trooper whose horse had been shot, he rode through heavy crossfire to within 300 metres of the enemy in order to rescue his comrade. Richardson returned to the Mounted Police after the war ended in 1902, and eventually reached the rank of sergeant-major. However, in 1907 poor health forced him to purchase his discharge and, eventually, to settle in Liverpool, England, where he became a recluse. During this period, another man named Arthur Richardson, a corporal in The Gordon Highlanders of the British Army, began passing himself off as the winner of the Victoria Cross. He succeeded so well that, when he died, he was buried with military honours. Ironically, the real Arthur Richardson, VC was discovered marching in the funeral cortège of his imposter. As a result, Richardson rose to a certain prominence in his late middle age. He died in Liverpool on 15 December 1932.

Not a Member of the Wargaming Society

If you would like to participate in the Battle of Eylau Tournament of the fall 2019 Eylau-Friedland Tournament and are not a member... You can join the Wargaming Society and sign up for the tournament.. Check out our various Age of Napoleon Armies and find a regiment you would like to command... Interest in other eras... You can join more the one...

Visit: http://www.wargamingsociety.com/joinsociety/wgsenlist.htm

Contribute to the Next Dispatch

If you would like to contribute to our 1 July 2019 dispatch please contact Al at al@wargamingsociety.com ...

Comments or suggestions are always welcome....