Age of Renaissance Scenarios

HPS - Musket & Pike

000.Getting Started

This getting started scenario introduces players to the various troop types present in the game. It is designed to accompany the Getting Started Help File to get a player up and running quickly with the game engine. Some infantry - arquebusiers, crossbowmen, archers - have firepower but often reduced melee capability, whereas others - pikemen, halberdiers and swordsmen - are unable to fire and intended exclusively for engaging in melee. There are also various cavalry types - heavy lancers used for smashing into the enemy line, mobile light cavalry intended for skirmishing and also dragoons, effectively mounted infantry. There is also a clear distinction between lighter field artillery and heavier guns more suited to sieges, but often deployed on the battlefield in this period. (Side A = French and Scottish, Side B = English and Spanish/Imperialist)

001.Seminara_a

Despite joining forces, the Spanish and Neapolitans under Gonsalvo de Cordova and King Ferrante II will have a difficult task defeating the Duc d'Aubigny's French army. The French gendarmes are superior to their Neapolitan chivalric counterpart, while the Spanish infantry are no real match for the renowned Swiss mercenaries, especially once their Neapolitan allies have fled the field. But Gonsalvo will learn from this defeat ... (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Neapolitan)

002.Seminara_b

Variant scenario with the armies still arriving on the battlefield. Despite joining forces, the Spanish and Neapolitans under Gonsalvo de Cordova and King Ferrante II will have a difficult task defeating the Duc d'Aubigny's French army. The French gendarmes are superior to their Neapolitan chivalric counterpart, while the Spanish infantry are no real match for the renowned Swiss mercenaries, especially once their Neapolitan allies have fled the field. But Gonsalvo will learn from this defeat ... (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Neapolitan)

003.Seminara_c

A variant of the historical scenario using the alternative pdt and with a less sophisticated command structure. Despite joining forces, the Spanish and Neapolitans under Gonsalvo de Cordova and King Ferrante II will have a difficult task defeating the Duc d'Aubigny's French army. The French gendarmes will no doubt prove superior to their Neapolitan chivalric counterpart, while the Spanish infantry are no match in the open for the renowned Swiss mercenaries, especially once their Neapolitan allies flee the field. But Gonsalvo will learn from this defeat ... (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Neapolitan)

004.Fornova_a

Despite a victory over the Aragonese-Neapolitan army at Seminara in June, the French position in southern Italy is quickly deteriorating and, with Venice entering the anti-French alliance, Milan switching sides and control of the sea lost, the strategic situation compels the French to retreat northwards. At Fornova, the French line of retreat is blocked by an Italian league army, composed of Milanese, Venetians and others. (Side A = French/Swiss/Scottish, Side B = Italian League)

005.Cerignola_a

To counter the strong French cavalry and Swiss pikemen, the Spanish general Gonsalvo de Cordova uses defensive tactics, deploying in a hilly vineyard and strengthening his position by constructing trenches. With the Spanish light horse screening their main position, the French leaders, Louis d'Armagnac Duke of Nemours and his rash subordinate Yves d'Alegre launch a direct frontal assault on the Spanish earthworks and are repulsed in disorder once Nemours himself is killed by an arquebus shot. Further badly coordinated attacks by the Swiss and Gascon foot falter at the earthworks in the face of withering volleys of arquebus shot and artillery fire. Finally, sensing victory, Gonsalvo counter-attacks and the dispirited French are driven off the battlefield. The Spanish ginetes harass the retreating enemy and the French artillery and baggage train are captured. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Spanish)

006.Knockdoe_a

In some ways this battle is more of a power struggle between two Irish factions rather than a straight forward English attempt to impose control over Ireland. Gerald Fitzgerald, Earl of Kildare had been imprisoned by Henry VII on charges of treason, but was then released and restored to favor in 1496 to restore order to Ireland. Since Kildare's rival, Ulick de Burgh - or Burke - was in alliance with a variety of anti-English factions it was possible to maintain that he was working for the King rather than just furthering his own interests. Although both armies contained gallowglas axemen, Kildare had armed and organized many of his troops with bills and bows after the English style of fighting - despite heavy casualties on both sides, this was probably the decisive factor in securing his victory. (Side A = Burke, Side B = Kildare) Note: Best played with the No Melee Elimination optional rule.

007.Knockdoe_b

A variant scenario in which Ulick has called out a large body of Kern to swell the ranks of his army. - In some ways this battle is more of a power struggle between two Irish factions rather than a straight forward English attempt to impose control over Ireland. Gerald Fitzgerald, Earl of Kildare had been imprisoned by Henry VII on charges of treason, but was then released and restored to favor in 1496 to restore order to Ireland. Since Kildare's rival, Ulick de Burgh - or Burke - was in alliance with a variety of anti-English factions it was possible to maintain that he was working for the King rather than just furthering his own interests. Although both armies contained gallowglas axemen, Kildare had armed and organized many of his troops with bills and bows after the English style of fighting - despite heavy casualties on both sides, this was probably the decisive factor in securing his victory. (Side A = Burke, Side B = Kildare) Note: Best played with the No Melee Elimination optional rule.

008.Agnadello_a

In December 1508, France, Spain, the Papacy and the Emperor Maximilian temporarily put all their differences aside and formed the League of Cambrai with the intention of crushing Venice. Only the new King of England, Henry VIII remained on friendly terms with the Italian republic, but there was no real prospect of any English assistance. Once a bull of excommunication had been proclaimed in April 1509, the French quickly moved in for the kill, hoping to seize all the spoils for herself before her "allies" could claim their share. The Venetian rearguard, under Bartolomeo d’Alviano, decided to stand and fight at Agnadello, despite orders from his commanding officer, Nicolò Orsini conte di Pitigliano, to avoid battle. Although the French were initially repulsed, the failure of Pitigliano to send reinforcements and Alviano's reluctance to break off and retreat, would prove disastrous for the Venetians. However, it was inevitable that this victory would only give the French a short lived advantage, since the League of Cambrai naturally fell apart as soon as the other members realized that the French intended to secure a dominant position in northern Italy. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Venetians)

009.Agnadello_b

A variant scenario with the Venetian player faced with the historical choice of reinforcing the rearguard or leaving them to their fate...an exit hex has been provided for this cowardly/prudent option. Meanwhile, the French player will be endeavoring to inflict as heavy losses as possible on the Venetian rearguard. - In December 1508, France, Spain, the Papacy and the Emperor Maximilian temporarily put all their differences aside and formed the League of Cambrai with the intention of crushing Venice. Only the new King of England, Henry VIII remained on friendly terms with the Italian republic, but there was no real prospect of any English assistance. Once a bull of excommunication had been proclaimed in April 1509, the French quickly moved in for the kill, hoping to seize all the spoils for herself before her "allies" could claim their share. The Venetian rearguard, under Bartolomeo d’Alviano, decided to stand and fight at Agnadello, despite orders from his commanding officer, Nicolò Orsini conte di Pitigliano, to avoid battle. Although the French were initially repulsed, the failure of Pitigliano to send reinforcements and Alviano's reluctance to break off and retreat, would prove disastrous for the Venetians. However, it was inevitable that this victory would only give the French a short lived advantage, since the League of Cambrai naturally fell apart as soon as the other members realized that the French intended to secure a dominant position in northern Italy. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Venetians)

010.Agnadello_c

A "what if" good weather variant scenario with the Venetian player faced with the historical choice of reinforcing the rearguard or leaving them to their fate...an exit hex has been provided for this cowardly/prudent option. Meanwhile, the French player will be endeavoring to inflict as heavy losses as possible on the Venetian rearguard. - In December 1508, France, Spain, the Papacy and the Emperor Maximilian temporarily put all their differences aside and formed the League of Cambrai with the intention of crushing Venice. Only the new King of England, Henry VIII remained on friendly terms with the Italian republic, but there was no real prospect of any English assistance. Once a bull of excommunication had been proclaimed in April 1509, the French quickly moved in for the kill, hoping to seize all the spoils for herself before her "allies" could claim their share. The Venetian rearguard, under Bartolomeo d’Alviano, decided to stand and fight at Agnadello, despite orders from his commanding officer, Nicolò Orsini conte di Pitigliano, to avoid battle. Although the French were initially repulsed, the failure of Pitigliano to send reinforcements and Alviano's reluctance to break off and retreat, would prove disastrous for the Venetians. However, it was inevitable that this victory would only give the French a short lived advantage, since the League of Cambrai naturally fell apart as soon as the other members realized that the French intended to secure a dominant position in northern Italy. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Venetians)

011.Ravenna_a

The Imperialist and Papal League forces must risk a decisive engagement to break the French/Ferrara siege of Ravenna. Rather than face the enemy in open battle, the Imperialists dig trenches and adopt a defensive position - a typical Spanish tactic that had proved successful at Cerignola and elsewhere. But in this battle the Imperialist/Papal army are outnumbered and outgunned by the French and their Ferrara allies, and have their backs to the river ... (Side A = French/Ferrara, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists & Papal)

012.Ravenna_b

Open battle variant - The Imperialist and Papal League forces must risk a decisive engagement to break the French/Ferrara siege of Ravenna. Historically, the Imperialists dug trenches and adopted a defensive position - a typical Spanish tactic that had proved successful at Cerignola and elsewhere - but in this variant scenario the Imperialists decide to face the enemy in open battle. The Imperialist/Papal army are outnumbered and outgunned by the French and their Ferrara allies. (Side A = French/Ferrara, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists& Papal)

013.Novara_a

Advancing in three unequal columns, the Swiss launch a surprise dawn attack on the unprepared French army with devastating effectiveness. (Side A = French, Side B = Swiss/Milanese

014.Novara_b

Historically, the Swiss launched a surprise night attack on the French camp. But what if they had waited until the morning, when a column of reinforcements was expected. The Swiss have more troops than in the historical battle, but they've lost the element of surprise. (Side A = French, Side B = Swiss/Milanese)

015.Guingate_a

Guingate, or "The Battle of the Spurs" - Encountering the English army without infantry support, the French cavalry's attempt to withdraw quickly turns into a rout when some fleeing stradiots bump into the gendarmes' flank. Although actual casualties are light, nine standards and at least 120 important prisoners are captured and the town of Therouanne is obliged to surrender on 22nd August. (Side A = French, Side B = English)

016.Guingate_b

Variant Pitched Battle - A hypothetical scenario that assumes that the entire French army was present at Guingate and was determined to fight the English ... - Encountering the English army without infantry support, the French cavalry's attempt to withdraw quickly turns into a rout when some fleeing stradiots bump into the gendarmes' flank. Although actual casualties are light, nine standards and at least 120 important prisoners are captured and the town of Therouanne is obliged to surrender on 22nd August. (Side A = French, Side B = English)

017.Flodden_a

Reluctant to attack the strongly held Scottish position on Flodden hill, Surrey conducted an audacious flank march, crossing the river Till and deploying the English army between Branxton village and Branxton hill, which the Scots were now occupying. However, instead of remaining where they were and awaiting the English attack, King James placed himself at the head of his army and descended the hill to attack. (Side A = Scottish, Side B = English)

018.Flodden_b

Variant with the French contingent represented as a separate army - Reluctant to attack the strongly held Scottish position on Flodden hill, Surrey conducted an audacious flank march, crossing the river Till and deploying the English army between Branxton village and Branxton hill, which the Scots were now occupying. However, instead of remaining where they were and awaiting the English attack, King James placed himself at the head of his army and descended the hill to attack. (Side A = Scottish/French, Side B = English)

019.Flodden_c

Variant using the alternative pdt and with the French contingent represented as a separate army - Reluctant to attack the strongly held Scottish position on Flodden hill, Surrey conducted an audacious flank march, crossing the river Till and deploying the English army between Branxton village and Branxton hill, which the Scots were now occupying. However, instead of remaining where they were and awaiting the English attack, King James placed himself at the head of his army and descended the hill to attack. (Side A = Scottish/French, Side B = English)

020.Chaldiran_a

The Ottoman Sultan, Selim I, having crossed the Armenian mountains, descended into the plain of Chaldiran, where Shah Ismail of the recently re-established Persian empire was waiting for him. The Turkish objective was to crush the Persian army and capture the enemy's new capital, Tabriz. But while the Turkish army was larger, it had suffered badly on the march, whereas the Persians were fresh. (To reflect the poor state of their horses, the movement allowance of the Turkish cavalry has been reduced) (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Persians)

021.Chaldiran_b

Variant scenario using the alternative pdt. The Ottoman Sultan, Selim I, having crossed the Armenian mountains, descended into the plain of Chaldiran, where Shah Ismail of the recently re-established Persian empire was waiting for him. The Turkish objective was to crush the Persian army and capture the enemy's new capital, Tabriz. But while the Turkish army was larger, it had suffered badly on the march, whereas the Persians were fresh. (To reflect the poor state of their horses, the movement allowance of the Turkish cavalry has been reduced) (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Persians)

022.Marignano_a

Having bribed the Swiss to abandon their Milanese ally, Maximilian Sforza, and return home, the French king Francis I was trying on a new suit of armor when he heard that they had left Milano and were marching towards his army. It was late afternoon, and although some 12,000 Swiss confederates had accepted the French bribe and departed, it was to be the start of a fierce two-day battle between the remaining Swiss confederates and their French opponents, who now outnumbered them approximately 2:1. Only the arrival of the Venetian allied army in support of the French induced the Swiss to yield the field and retreat in good order. The French were apparently too exhausted to pursue, but the Venetian cavalry suffered a number of casualties, including their leader, Orsini, while attempting to cut off the Swiss retreat. Although some 400 Zurich pikemen were trapped in a village and shot down from a safe distance by artillery, the bulk of the Swiss managed to fall back to Milano, where they demanded three months overdue wages from Sforza. Since he was unable to pay up, they left him to make what terms he could with the French. Note: This scenario is probably best played as Swiss against the A/I, or else for the more experienced player to take the Swiss side and select the optional rules, since an astute choice of these will give the Swiss player a better chance. For two players of equal skill, the "what if" Marignano_c scenario with additional Swiss troops should provide a more balanced game. (Side A = French/Venetians, Side B = Swiss)

023.Marignano_b

Variant scenario using the alternative pdt. Having bribed the Swiss to abandon their Milanese ally, Maximilian Sforza, and return home, the French king Francis I was trying on a new suit of armor when he heard that they had left Milano and were marching towards his army. It was late afternoon, and although some 12,000 Swiss confederates had accepted the French bribe and departed, it was to be the start of a fierce two-day battle between the remaining Swiss confederates and their French opponents, who now outnumbered them approximately 2:1. Only the arrival of the Venetian allied army in support of the French induced the Swiss to yield the field and retreat in good order. The French were apparently too exhausted to pursue, but the Venetian cavalry suffered a number of casualties, including their leader, Orsini, while attempting to cut off the Swiss retreat. Although some 400 Zurich pikemen were trapped in a village and shot down from a safe distance by artillery, the bulk of the Swiss managed to fall back to Milano, where they demanded three months overdue wages from Sforza. Since he was unable to pay up, they left him to make what terms he could with the French. Note: This scenario is probably best played as Swiss against the A/I, or else for the more experienced player to take the Swiss side and select the optional rules, since an astute choice of these will give the Swiss player a better chance. For two players of equal skill, the "what if" Marignano_c scenario with additional Swiss troops should provide a more balanced game. (Side A = French/Venetians, Side B = Swiss)

024.Marignano_c

Historically, Francis I bribed some 12,000 Swiss to make peace with him, but what if they'd refused his offer and had taken part in the subsequent battle? Having (in this case unsuccessfully) bribed the Swiss to abandon their Milanese ally, Maximilian Sforza, and return home, the French king Francis I was trying on a new suit of armor when he heard that they had left Milano and were marching towards his army. It was late afternoon, and although some 12,000 Swiss confederates had accepted the French bribe and departed, it was to be the start of a fierce two-day battle between the remaining Swiss confederates and their French opponents, who now outnumbered them approximately 2:1. Only the arrival of the Venetian allied army in support of the French induced the Swiss to yield the field and retreat in good order. The French were apparently too exhausted to pursue, but the Venetian cavalry suffered a number of casualties, including their leader, Orsini, while attempting to cut off the Swiss retreat. Although some 400 Zurich pikemen were trapped in a village and shot down from a safe distance by artillery, the bulk of the Swiss managed to fall back to Milano, where they demanded three months overdue wages from Sforza. Since he was unable to pay up, they left him to make what terms he could with the French. (Side A = French/Venetians, Side B = Swiss)

025.Marignano_d

This short scenario covers just the first afternoon of the battle. Having bribed the Swiss to abandon their Milanese ally, Maximilian Sforza, and return home, the French king Francis I was trying on a new suit of armor when he heard that they had left Milano and were marching towards his army. It was late afternoon, and although some 12,000 Swiss confederates had accepted the French bribe and departed, it was to be the start of a fierce two-day battle between the remaining Swiss confederates and their French opponents, who now outnumbered them approximately 2:1. Only the arrival of the Venetian allied army in support of the French induced the Swiss to yield the field and retreat in good order. The French were apparently too exhausted to pursue, but the Venetian cavalry suffered a number of casualties, including their leader, Orsini, while attempting to cut off the Swiss retreat. Although some 400 Zurich pikemen were trapped in a village and shot down from a safe distance by artillery, the bulk of the Swiss managed to fall back to Milano, where they demanded three months overdue wages from Sforza. Since he was unable to pay up, they left him to make what terms he could with the French. Note: This scenario is probably best played as Swiss against the A/I, or else for the more experienced player to take the Swiss side and select the optional rules, since an astute choice of these will give the Swiss player a better chance. For two players of equal skill, the "what if" Marignano_c scenario with additional Swiss troops should provide a more balanced game. (Side A = French/Venetians, Side B = Swiss)

026.Dabik_a

After defeating the Persians at Kaldiran in 1514, the Ottoman Sultan Selim I turns his attention to the Mameluke empire and invades northern Syria, engaging the Mamelukes under their aged ruler, Kansou-Ghori, at Marj Dabik on an open plain approximately ten miles north of Aleppo. The Mameluke cavalry is first class, but the Turks have more troops and better infantry - including 8000 Janissaries - and 50 guns. (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Mamelukes)

027.Raydaniyah_a

After defeating the Mamelukes at Marj Dabik the previous year, Selim I secures Syria and then marches south towards Egypt, the main Mameluke power base. The Mamelukes however are able to field a fresh army and confront the Turks at the village of Raydaniyah. After the previous defeat, the Mamelukes decide to set up a strong defensive position, with artillery taken from city walls or purchased from Venice. But will the Turks launch a direct frontal attack against such a strong line of defense ... (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Mamelukes)

028.Raydaniyah_b

Variant scenario with the Turkish outflanking force arriving later. This will give the Mamelukes the chance to counter-attack and defeat the Turkish holding force to their front before the main Turkish army arrives on their flank. After defeating the Mamelukes at Marj Dabik the previous year, Selim I secures Syria and then marches south towards Egypt, the main Mameluke power base. The Mamelukes however are able to field a fresh army and confront the Turks at the village of Raydaniyah. After the previous defeat, the Mamelukes decide to set up a strong defensive position, with artillery taken from city walls or purchased from Venice. But will the Turks launch a direct frontal attack against such a strong line of defense ... (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Mamelukes)

029.Bicocca_a

Thirsty for all the glory, the headstrong Swiss mercenaries rushed forward against the almost impregnable Imperialist defenses without waiting for the support of the rest of the French army. A thousand Swiss confederate troops fall before they can even reach the sunken ditch and attempt to scale the almost impregnable Spanish defenses. Meanwhile, with no orders to advance in support of the Swiss, the rest of the French army are merely spectators. In this scenario, the fixed troops have a small chance of releasing early so that they can assist the Swiss assault. The Milanese allies on the Imperialist side also have a small chance of releasing, but their main function is to deter the enemy from outflanking the Imperialist position. (Side A = Swiss, French & Venetians, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists & Milanese)

030.Bicocca_b

Variant scenario using the alternative pdt. Thirsty for all the glory, the headstrong Swiss mercenaries rushed forward against the almost impregnable Imperialist defenses without waiting for the support of the rest of the French army. A thousand Swiss confederate troops fall before they can even reach the sunken ditch and attempt to scale the almost impregnable Spanish defenses. Meanwhile, with no orders to advance in support of the Swiss, the rest of the French army are merely spectators. In this scenario, the fixed troops have a small chance of releasing early so that they can assist the Swiss assault. The Milanese allies on the Imperialist side also have a small chance of releasing, but their main function is to deter the enemy from outflanking the Imperialist position. (Side A = Swiss, French & Venetians, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists & Milanese)

031.Bicocca_c

Early release variant, with the French, Venetian and Milanese contingents able to participate in the battle after the first hour. Thirsty for all the glory, the headstrong Swiss mercenaries rushed forward against the almost impregnable Imperialist defenses without waiting for the support of the rest of the French army. A thousand Swiss confederate troops fall before they can even reach the sunken ditch and attempt to scale the almost impregnable Spanish defenses. Meanwhile, with no orders to advance in support of the Swiss, the rest of the French army are merely spectators. In this scenario, the fixed troops have a small chance of releasing early so that they can assist the Swiss assault. The Milanese allies on the Imperialist side also have a small chance of releasing, but their main function is to deter the enemy from outflanking the Imperialist position. (Side A = Swiss, French & Venetians, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists & Milanese)

032.Pavia_a

Breaking a hole in the northern sector of the park wall, the Spanish launch a surprise dawn attack on the French army, combined with a simultaneous sortie from the city of Pavia. With their movements concealed by dense early morning mist, the Spanish quickly split the French up into several isolated groups and overwhelm them with numbers and superior firepower. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists)

033.Pavia_b

Good weather variant using the alternative pdt to increase the effectiveness of the Spanish arquebusiers - Breaking a hole in the northern sector of the park wall, the Spanish launch a surprise dawn attack on the French army, combined with a simultaneous sortie from the city of Pavia. With their movements concealed by dense early morning mist, the Spanish quickly split the French up into several isolated groups and overwhelm them with numbers and superior firepower. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists)

034.Mohacs_a

The flower of Hungarian chivalry prepares to face the might and superior numbers of the Turkish army on the open plains of Mohacs, with the river Danube and marshy ground on one flank. But on the other flank, a force of Bosnian horsemen hover, waiting for just the right moment to crash into the Hungarian flank. (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Hungarians)

035.Mohacs_b

Variant scenario using the alternative pdt. The flower of Hungarian chivalry prepares to face the might and superior numbers of the Turkish army on the open plains of Mohacs, with the river Danube and marshy ground on one flank. But on the other flank, a force of Bosnian horsemen hover, waiting for just the right moment to crash into the Hungarian flank. (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Hungarians)

036.Mohacs_c

Variant scenario which starts at the point where the Hungarian cavalry have charged into the Turkish light cavalry and are about to discover the location of the Ottoman artillery! The flower of Hungarian chivalry prepares to face the might and superior numbers of the Turkish army on the open plains of Mohacs, with the river Danube and marshy ground on one flank. But on the other flank, a force of Bosnian horsemen hover, waiting for just the right moment to crash into the Hungarian flank. (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Hungarians)

037.Mohacs_d

Historically, the Hungarians decided to fight an open battle and used their cavalry offensively in an attempt to smash the numerical superior Turkish army. However, what if they'd taken Leonard Gnomski's advice to fight a defensive battle behind their wagons, imitating the typical Hussite tactic of a century earlier? Would the Turks attempt to assault the defensive position or just wait until the Hungarians run low on supplies and are forced to break out or starve? (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Hungarians)

038.Wien_a

After attempts to undermine the walls of Wien (or Vienna) have failed, the Turks are desperate for a quick victory, since there's insufficient fodder for their horses and sickness and desertion are reducing the effectiveness of the besieging army. In addition, there's a report that an Imperialist relief army of 80,000 men is being assembled to break the siege. (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Imperialists)

039.Wien_b

This hypothetical scenario assumes that the advance guard of the Imperialist relief army arrives just as the Turks are about to launch their final assault on the city. - After attempts to undermine the walls of Wien (or Vienna) have failed, the Turks are desperate for a quick victory, since there's insufficient fodder for their horses and sickness and desertion are reducing the effectiveness of the besieging army. In addition, there's a report that an Imperialist relief army of 80,000 men is being assembled to break the siege. (Side A = Ottoman Turks, Side B = Imperialists)

040.Solway_a

Sir Thomas Wharton with an English force of around 3000 men encounters a larger force of Scottish marauders near Carlisle on 24 November 1542. In the absence of the Scottish king, Sinclair attempts to assume leadership, but the Scots are more interesting in getting away with their loot than fighting a battle. (Side A = Scottish, Side B = English & Mercenary arquebusiers)

041.Cerisoles_a

The French general Enghien lays siege to Carignano to draw out the Imperialists and oblige them to risk a pitched battle - a rare occurrence at this stage in the Italian Wars. The two armies are drawn up in battle array, facing each other on opposite hillsides with a valley between them. The skirmishers of both sides have already been engaged indecisively for several hours, so it's time for the two armies to risk all in open battle. While the Imperialists have more troops, the French cavalry is stronger. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists)

042.Boulogne_a

This scenario represents the English besieging army's assault against the weak defenses of the lower town, several days before the arrival of Henry VIII. However, the upper town would prove a tougher nut to crack and only eventually surrendered after several months of battering and undermining on 14 September. (Side A = French, Side B = English)

043.Boulogne_b

This hypothetical scenario, involving over 30,000 men a side, assumes that the rest of the English army and also Count Buren's allied Burgundian contingent arrive just as the lower town is about to be assaulted. However, a French relief force is also marching towards the besieged town ... Note: "Burgundian" = Imperialist forces from present-day Holland, Belgium and Luxembourg. (Side A = French, Side B = English/Burgundians)

044.Boulogne_c

Boulogne had surrendered to Henry VIII on 14 September 1544 and, by the 3rd October the English army had embarked for England, leaving a garrison of 4000 men under Lord Lisle. On the night of October 6-7 a French assault force launched a surprise "camisade" (the troops wore white shirts to distinguish themselves from the enemy) in an attempt to recapture the town. Despite the failure of the 6000 strong Swiss contingent to support the assault, the lower town was quickly overrun, but the English fell back to the upper town and, rallied by Sir Thomas Poynings, launched a successful counter-attack. Monluc took part in the camisade and wrote an account of his adventures. Monluc was also present at the battle of Cerisoles in1544 and took part in the subsequent French Wars of Religion until his death in 1577. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = English)

045.Boulogne_d

"Camisade" of Boulogne "what if" - This variant has a much higher probability of the 6000 strong Swiss contingent releasing to support the assault. Boulogne had surrendered to Henry VIII on 14 September 1544 and, by the 3rd October the English army had embarked for England, leaving a garrison of 4000 men under Lord Lisle. On the night of October 6-7 a French assault force launched a surprise "camisade" (the troops wore white shirts to distinguish themselves from the enemy) in an attempt to recapture the town. Despite the failure of the 6000 strong Swiss contingent to support the assault, the lower town was quickly overrun, but the English fell back to the upper town and, rallied by Sir Thomas Poynings, launched a successful counter-attack. Monluc took part in the camisade and wrote an account of his adventures. Monluc was also present at the battle of Cerisoles in1544 and took part in the subsequent French Wars of Religion until his death in 1577. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = English)

046.Boulogne_e

French Siege of Boulogne commencing with the nocturnal camisade and continuing into the following day, with the main French army releasing at 8am. The Swiss will also release at this point if they haven't done so already. Boulogne had surrendered to Henry VIII on 14 September 1544 and, by the 3rd October the English army had embarked for England, leaving a garrison of 4000 men under Lord Lisle. On the night of October 6-7 a French assault force launched a surprise "camisade" (the troops wore white shirts to distinguish themselves from the enemy) in an attempt to recapture the town. Despite the failure of the 6000 strong Swiss contingent to support the assault, the lower town was quickly overrun, but the English fell back to the upper town and, rallied by Sir Thomas Poynings, launched a successful counter-attack. Monluc took part in the camisade and wrote an account of his adventures. Monluc was also present at the battle of Cerisoles in 1544 and took part in the subsequent French Wars of Religion until his death in 1577. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = English)

047.Ancrum_a

This short scenario starts off at the point where the English cavalry have been repulsed by the Scots and, in their haste to escape, have collided with the foreign mercenaries still struggling up the hill and attempting to form into line. It is at this point that the 700 Scottish mercenaries tear off their English badges and join in the battle on the side of their compatriots. (Side A = Scottish, Side B = English/Spanish Mercenaries)

048.Ancrum_b

Sir Ralph Evers had led previous raids into Scotland and on this occasion he had quite a substantial force under his command - some 3,000 Spanish and German mercenary foot soldiers in addition to about 1,500 border horse and 700 "friendly" Scottish mercenaries, who seemed quite happy to fight their own countrymen for English gold. The Scottish Earl of Angus, whose lands were being ravaged, decided he was strong enough to risk confronting the raiders when additional forces under the Earl of Arran and Sir Walter Scott of Buccleuch came to his assistance. The Scots were still outnumbered, but the English had been marching all day, burning crops and settlements and amassing plunder ... and the Scottish mercenaries were to prove less than reliable. A young Scottish woman named Lilliard fought with great courage and was slain in this battle and the following verses were written in her honour on her tombstone: "Fair maiden Lilliard lies under this stane; / Little was her stature, but muckle was her fame. / Upon the English loons she laid monie thumps, / an' when her legs were cuttit off she fought upon her stumps." (Side A = Scottish, Side B = English/Spanish Mercenaries)

049.Ancrum_c

Variant scenario designed for English player against Scottish A/I. This short scenario starts off at the point where the English cavalry have been repulsed by the Scots and, in their haste to escape, have collided with the foreign mercenaries still struggling up the hill and attempting to form into line. It is at this point that the 700 Scottish mercenaries tear off their English badges and join in the battle on the side of their compatriots. (Side A = Scottish, Side B = English/Spanish Mercenari

050.Pinkie_a

A disaster for Scotland perhaps even more grievous than Flodden, the battle originally called Muskelburgh Field - and referred to as "Black Saturday" in Scotland - is now usually know as the Battle of Pinkie Cleuch. As at Flodden, the Scottish abandoned their defensive position and crossed the river Esk to attack their enemies, only to be halted by a series of desperate cavalry charges, softened up by archers and firearms and pounded at close range by the 80 English guns until at least 10,000 Scots were dead or wounded and the survivors fled. (Side A = Scottish, Side B = English & Mercenaries)

051.Pinkie_b

Historical variant scenario using the alternative pdt - A disaster for Scotland perhaps even more grievous than Flodden, the battle originally called Muskelburgh Field - and referred to as "Black Saturday" in Scotland - is now usually know as the Battle of Pinkie Cleuch. As at Flodden, the Scottish abandoned their defensive position and crossed the river Esk to attack their enemies, only to be halted by a series of desperate cavalry charges, softened up by archers and firearms and pounded at close range by the 80 English guns until at least 10,000 Scots were dead or wounded and the survivors fled. (Side A = Scottish, Side B = English & Mercenaries)

052.Marciano_a

Marciano-Scannagallo - Having expelled the Spanish garrison from Siena in 1552, the Sienese Republic sought French assistance to maintain their independence. Forced to abandon the siege of Arezzo by the arrival of 3,000 Roman infantry, the Franco-Sienese general Piero Strozzi fell back towards Marciano with a Imperialist-Tuscan army under Giacomo dei Medici, Marquis of Marignano in pursuit. The two armies of approximately equal strength faced each other for three days without a major engagement, until Strozzi was obliged to abandon a strong position due to lack of money and provisions. Sending his artillery on ahead during the night, Strozzi made the mistake of waiting until the following morning before ordering the rest of the army to retreat. Unfortunately, the enemy were in close proximity and ready to attack ... (Side A = French/Sienese & Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Tuscan)

053.Marciano_b

Marciano-Scannagallo - Variant scenario with the French better prepared for action. Having expelled the Spanish garrison from Siena in 1552, the Sienese Republic sought French assistance to maintain their independence. Forced to abandon the siege of Arezzo by the arrival of 3,000 Roman infantry, the Franco-Sienese general Piero Strozzi fell back towards Marciano with a Imperialist-Tuscan army under Giacomo dei Medici, Marquis of Marignano in pursuit. The two armies of approximately equal strength faced each other for three days without a major engagement, until Strozzi was obliged to abandon a strong position due to lack of money and provisions. Sending his artillery on ahead during the night, Strozzi made the mistake of waiting until the following morning before ordering the rest of the army to retreat. Unfortunately, the enemy were in close proximity and ready to attack ... (Side A = French/Sienese & Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Tuscan)

054.Marciano_c

Marciano-Scannagallo (at 50yd scale) - Having expelled the Spanish garrison from Siena in 1552, the Sienese Republic sought French assistance to maintain their independence. Forced to abandon the siege of Arezzo by the arrival of 3,000 Roman infantry, the Franco-Sienese general Piero Strozzi fell back towards Marciano with a Imperialist-Tuscan army under Giacomo dei Medici, Marquis of Marignano in pursuit. The two armies of approximately equal strength faced each other for three days without a major engagement, until Strozzi was obliged to abandon a strong position due to lack of money and provisions. Sending his artillery on ahead during the night, Strozzi made the mistake of waiting until the following morning before ordering the rest of the army to retreat. Unfortunately, the enemy were in close proximity and ready to attack ... (Side A = French/Sienese & Swiss, Side B = Spanish/Tuscan)

055.St_Quentin_a

With the Allied forces besieging St Quentin, Montmorency leads a French relief force northwards from La Fere with the intention of reinforcing the garrison to enable it to withstand a longer siege. To achieve this, the French must secure the Spanish held Fauberg de L'Isle before additional Imperialist forces can cross the Somme. Montmorency must act quickly, since his army is outnumbered. The scenario opens at the point where the French are approaching the Fauberg, while only a small force of reiters has been sent to block the important ford at Rouvray ... (Side A = French, Side B = Imperialist/Spanish and English)

056.St_Quentin_b

Variant scenario using the alternative pdt. With the Allied forces besieging St Quentin, Montmorency leads a French relief force northwards from La Fere with the intention of reinforcing the garrison to enable it to withstand a longer siege. To achieve this, the French must secure the Spanish held Fauberg de L'Isle before additional Imperialist forces can cross the Somme. Montmorency must act quickly, since his army is outnumbered. The scenario opens at the point where the French are approaching the Fauberg, while only a small force of reiters has been sent to block the important ford at Rouvray ... (Side A = French, Side B = Imperialist/Spanish and English)

057.Calais_a

After the capture of St Quentins, Pembroke's expeditionary force had returned to England, leaving Calais badly undermanned. Meanwhile, the Duc de Guise decides to launch a surprise New Year assault on the last remaining English outpost in France. This scenario starts on January 3, before the English decide to abandon Newham Bridge without a fight, preferring to withdraw the fort's defenders back into Calais itself to reinforce the understrength garrison. (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = English)

058.Calais_b

Calais Relieved! "what if" - On the 8th of January an hastily assembled English relief force arrived off Calais, only to find the French flag flying everywhere, since Calais had already capitulated on the evening of the 6th January. But what if the garrison hadn't surrendered before this relief force turned up? (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = English)

059.Gravelines_a

Despite orders not to risk his approximately 10,000 strong army, the French general Des Thermes set off from Calais on a 12 day raid towards Dunkirk, leaving Imperialist-held Gravelines with a 4000 strong garrison in his rear. On returning from their raid, the French reach the river Aa and wonder whether it's worthwhile attempting to capture Gravelines or if it would be better to just retreat to Calais with the booty. Meanwhile an Imperialist army under Egmont is approaching and some English warships are also nearby. Having forded the Aa at low tide, the French find themselves caught in a trap ... (Side A = French, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists & English)

060.Gravelines_b

This scenario starts with the French army on the return march from raiding Dunkirk and with the Imperialist troops still some distance away. Will the French make it safely back to Calais, or with they be brought to battle and defeated? (Side A = French, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists & English)

061.Gravelines_c

This scenario, using the alternative pdt, starts with the French army on the return march from raiding Dunkirk and with the Imperialist troops still some distance away. Will the French make it safely back to Calais, or with they be brought to battle and defeated? (Side A = French, Side B = Spanish/Imperialists & English)

062.Dreux_a

Despite possessing a cavalry superiority, the Huguenots fail to conduct a proper reconnaissance of the Catholic position. Despite initial successes, the steadfastness of the Swiss hold off the Huguenot cavalry and decide the outcome. However, with a weaker cavalry force, the Catholics are unable to prevent most of the Huguenot army from getting away. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

063.Dreux_b

Variant scenario with part of the Catholic army initially fixed. Despite possessing a cavalry superiority, the Huguenots fail to conduct a proper reconnaissance of the Catholic position. Despite initial successes, the steadfastness of the Swiss hold off the Huguenot cavalry and decide the outcome. However, with a weaker cavalry force, the Catholics are unable to prevent most of the Huguenot army from getting away. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

064.Dreux_c

This hypothetical scenario assumes that the Huguenots had in fact managed to link up with an English expeditionary force at Le Havre as intended. Despite possessing a cavalry superiority, the Huguenots fail to conduct a proper reconnaissance of the Catholic position. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots/English)

065.St Denis_a

Pitching camp at St Denis, the Huguenots have decided to blockade Paris itself. However, instead of remaining inactive inside the city walls, the Catholics under Montmorency decide on a sortie against the numerically inferior Huguenots before their reinforcements can arrive. The battle opens at the point where the Catholic cavalry are attempting to outflank the Huguenots and run into the entrenched arquebusiers on the flanks. (Side A = Catholics, Side B = Huguenots)

066.St Denis_b

Dandelot to the rescue! - This hypothetical scenario assumes that Dandelot's troops arrive in time for the battle rather than the following day. Although the Huguenots are still outnumbered 2:1, many of the Catholics are untrained and ill-equipped Parisian militia. Pitching camp at St Denis, the Huguenots have decided to blockade Paris itself. However, instead of remaining inactive inside the city walls, the Catholics under Montmorency decide on a sortie against the numerically inferior Huguenots before their reinforcements can arrive. The battle opens at the point where the Catholic cavalry are attempting to outflank the Huguenots and run into the entrenched arquebusiers on the flanks. (Side A = Catholics, Side B = Huguenots)

067.St Denis_c

Dandelot to the rescue! - Variant scenario designed for human player against Catholic A/I, so there is no A/I script for the Huguenot "B" side. This hypothetical scenario assumes that Dandelot's troops arrive in time for the battle rather than the following day. Although the Huguenots are still outnumbered 2:1, many of the Catholics are untrained and ill-equipped Parisian militia. Pitching camp at St Denis, the Huguenots have decided to blockade Paris itself. However, instead of remaining inactive inside the city walls, the Catholics under Montmorency decide on a sortie against the numerically inferior Huguenots before their reinforcements can arrive. The battle opens at the point where the Catholic cavalry are attempting to outflank the Huguenots and run into the entrenched arquebusiers on the flanks. (Side A = Catholics, Side B = Huguenots)

068.St Denis_d

Assault on Paris. In this hypothetical scenario, the Huguenots have the chance to launch an assault on Paris while defended only by the city militia, but Catholic reinforcements are due to arrive. However, there's a chance that Dandelot will also turn up to assist the Huguenots. (Side A = Catholics, Side B = Huguenots)

069.Langside_a

Mary Queen of Scots, having escaped from Lochleven Castle, quickly raises an army of some 6000 men to oppose her half brother, James Stewart, Earl of Moray, who'd been appointed Regent for her son on her forced abdication the previous year. Mary's objective is to reach the safety of Dumbarton Castle and then raise additional troops; but Moray, learning of her escape, hastily assembles a force to block her route at the little village of Langside a few miles south of Glasgow. (Side A = Mary's Army, Side B = Regent's Army)

070.Langside_b

Variant scenario with more artillery ammo and modified victory levels. Historically, the battle only lasted some 45 minutes, so the 8 turn version is already more than twice as long as the actual battle - but a 3 turn scenario wouldn't give the players much time to achieve anything! However, a 15 turn scenario will provide sufficient time to fight it out ... or for the Queen's infantry to reach the exit hex. Mary Queen of Scots, having escaped from Lochleven Castle, quickly raises an army of some 6000 men to oppose her half brother, James Stewart, Earl of Moray, who'd been appointed Regent for her son on her forced abdication the previous year. Mary's objective is to reach the safety of Dumbarton Castle and then raise additional troops; but Moray, learning of her escape, hastily assembles a force to block her route at the little village of Langside a few miles south of Glasgow. (Side A = Mary's Army, Side B = Regent's Army)

071.Heiligerlee_a

Having collected a small band of German Reiters and Landsknechts, Louis of Nassau marches into Groningen province and raises Friesland in revolt from Spanish rule. Determined to crush the Dutch "rabble" before the insurrection gets out of hand, the Duke of Aremberg (also the Stadtholder of Friesland) decides to strike quickly, without waiting for a few hundred extra reinforcements under Count Meghen. But, Louis and Adolf of Nassau, the brothers of William of Orange, have laid a trap for the impetuous Spaniards ... (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

072.Heiligerlee_b

Variant with the prospect of Count Meghem's troops arriving in time to assist the Spanish. Having collected a small band of German Reiters and Landsknechts, Louis of Nassau marches into Groningen province and raises Friesland in revolt from Spanish rule. Determined to crush the Dutch "rabble" before the insurrection gets out of hand, the Duke of Aremberg (also the Stadtholder of Friesland) decides to strike quickly, without waiting for a few hundred extra reinforcements under Count Meghem. But, Louis and Adolf of Nassau, the brothers of William of Orange, have laid a trap for the impetuous Spaniards ... (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

073.Jemmingen_a

While only slightly outnumbered by the Spanish, the Dutch troops are of inferior quality, so Louis of Nassau decides to adopt a strong defensive position at Jemmingen, protected by the River Ems and with trenches and earthworks. However, since the Spanish forces initially sent against them are far fewer - and the bulk of the Spanish army is kept out of sight and remains undetected - the Dutch are tempted to come out of their trenches and launch a counter attack, thus falling into the trap set by the Spanish general Alva. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

074.Jemmingen_b

Jemmingen variant scenario with the Dutch concentrated in their trenches. While only slightly outnumbered by the Spanish, the Dutch troops are of inferior quality, so Louis of Nassau decides to adopt a strong defensive position at Jemmingen, protected by the River Ems and with trenches and earthworks. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

075.Jodoigne_a

Alva seizes the opportunity of destroying part of the Dutch army, isolated during a river crossing. He orders his son, Don Fredrigo, with a force of four thousand foot and three thousand horse, to cut off the Dutch rear-guard - about three thousand men under Count Hoogstraaten. The main armies on both sides took no part in the action and are therefore fixed. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

076.Jodoigne_b

Variant scenario, with no Dutch exit hex and the fixed troops having a better chance of releasing. Alva seizes the opportunity of destroying part of the Dutch army, isolated during a river crossing. He orders his son, Don Fredrigo, with a force of four thousand foot and three thousand horse, to cut off the Dutch rear-guard - about three thousand men under Count Hoogstraaten. The main armies on both sides took no part in the action and are therefore fixed. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

077.Jodoigne_c

A variant scenario with no fixed troops. The Dutch will have the opportunity of rescuing the rearguard and the main Spanish army will see some action. - Alva seizes the opportunity of destroying part of the Dutch army, isolated during a river crossing. He orders his son, Don Fredrigo, with a force of four thousand foot and three thousand horse, to cut off the Dutch rear-guard - about three thousand men under Count Hoogstraaten. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

078.Jodoigne_d

The Dutch army is marching southwards from Saint Trond with the intention of crossing the river Gette and then joining forces with de Genlis' French Huguenots at Waveren. However, Alva's Spanish army is pursuing them, waiting for a suitable opportunity to strike ... Historically, the Dutch rearguard was isolated and cut to pieces after the main army had crossed the river. But this scenario allows the Dutch more options - to pick a convenient location to fight a pitched battle or attempt to cross the Gette and continue the march. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

079.Jodoigne_e

Variant scenario using the alternative pdt. The Dutch army is marching southwards from Saint Trond with the intention of crossing the river Gette and then joining forces with de Genlis' French Huguenots at Waveren. However, Alva's Spanish army is pursuing them, waiting for a suitable opportunity to strike ... Historically, the Dutch rearguard was isolated and cut to pieces after the main army had crossed the river. But this scenario allows the Dutch more options - to pick a convenient location to fight a pitched battle or attempt to cross the Gette and continue the march. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

080.Jarnac_a

Outnumbered and outmanoeuvred, Coligny deploys his Huguenots in front of the Guirlande, a marshy rivulet, and with the river Charente protecting his right flank and the village of Triac on his left. In this defensive position, he hopes to hold off the Catholic army until Conde can arrive from Cognac with reinforcements. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

081.Moncontour_a

attack. Meanwhile, the Catholic general Tavannes, who had failed to properly exploit his success at Jarnac earlier in the year, took his time bringing his army into action, providing the Huguenot guns with a good opportunity to inflict heavy casualties on Montpensier's cavalry. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

082.Moncontour_b

To reflect Tavannes' hesitancy at the start of the battle, the Catholic army is initially fixed and may release piecemeal. Facing superior number, as usual, the Huguenot leader Coligny was reluctant to attack. Meanwhile, the Catholic general Tavannes, who had failed to properly exploit his success at Jarnac earlier in the year, took his time bringing his army into action, providing the Huguenot guns with a good opportunity to inflict heavy casualties on Montpensier's cavalry. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

083.Moncontour_c

Cavalry battle - Although the Swiss played a decisive part in the outcome, Moncontour was essentially a cavalry battle. This scenario reflects this by having the infantry on both sides initially fixed. Of course infantry will automatically release early if approached by enemy cavalry, but this variant scenario allows the players to conduct a primarily cavalry v cavalry engagement. Facing superior number, as usual, the Huguenot leader Coligny was reluctant to attack. Meanwhile, the Catholic general Tavannes, who had failed to properly exploit his success at Jarnac earlier in the year, took his time bringing his army into action, providing the Huguenot guns with a good opportunity to inflict heavy casualties on Montpensier's cavalry. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

084.Mookerheyde_a

Having gathered a small army of some 2000 reiters and 6000 foot, Louis of Nassau marches along the Meuse with the intention of joining forces with his brother William of Orange, who had assembled an army at Bommel, before attempting to relieve Leyden. However, the Spanish are determined to prevent the enemy from combining his forces, and a force some 5000 strong, but with probably less than 1000 cavalry, under Sancho de Avila has been sent to block Louis' advance at Mookerheyde. The Dutch deploy with their entrenched left flank resting on the river Maas (or Meuse) and with a large wood called the Moocker Heyde on the right. The Dutch outnumber the Spanish and have a lot more cavalry which, positioned on the right flank, plans to crush the Spanish left and then outflank the enemy infantry in the centre. However, as usual, the Spanish troops are better quality, and this may prove decisive. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

085.Mookerheyde_b

Variant scenario designed for Spanish player against Dutch A/I. Having gathered a small army of some 2000 reiters and 6000 foot, Louis of Nassau marches along the Meuse with the intention of joining forces with his brother William of Orange, who had assembled an army at Bommel, before attempting to relieve Leyden. However, the Spanish are determined to prevent the enemy from combining his forces, and a force some 5000 strong, but with probably less than 1000 cavalry, under Sancho de Avila has been sent to block Louis' advance at Mookerheyde. The Dutch deploy with their entrenched left flank resting on the river Maas (or Meuse) and with a large wood called the Moocker Heyde on the right. The Dutch outnumber the Spanish and have a lot more cavalry which, positioned on the right flank, plans to crush the Spanish left and then outflank the enemy infantry in the centre. However, as usual, the Spanish troops are better quality, and this may prove decisive. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

086.Gemblours_a

The States General (Dutch) army, approximately 20,000 strong, was deployed in a good position covering the Brussels road in preparation for the Spanish attack. But learning that Don John of Austria had received reinforcements and was at Namur, the cautious de Goignies decides to retreat back up the Brussels road. But this gives the advancing Spanish cavalry an excellent opportunity to catch the Dutch on the march and cut them to pieces. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

087.Gemblours_b

Variant scenario that starts before the Dutch make their disastrous decision to retreat. Perhaps they should stand and fight a pitched battle on favourable ground, or even attempt to outmanoeuvre the Spanish and try to capture Namurs? (This was in fact their objective until they found out about the Spanish reinforcements) The two armies are approximately equal in size, so if the troops are handled astutely, there should be a good chance of either side securing a decisive victory. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

088.Gemblours_c

Variant scenario, using the alternative pdt, that starts before the Dutch make their disastrous decision to retreat. Perhaps they should stand and fight a pitched battle on favourable ground, or even attempt to outmanoeuvre the Spanish and try to capture Namurs? (This was in fact their objective until they found out about the Spanish reinforcements) The two armies are approximately equal in size, so if the troops are handled astutely, there should be a good chance of either side securing a decisive victory. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

089.Alcantara_a

After the death of King Sebastian I of Portugal in the disastrous battle of Alcácer Quibir against the Moroccans in 1578, the throne passed to his aged uncle Henri I Bishop of Evora, who himself died in 1580 leaving two rival claimants, Antonio Prior of Ocrato and Philip II King of Spain, who raises an army and invades Portugal when his rival crowns himself king with popular support. After a few minor skirmishes and sieges, the Spanish army approaches Lisbon and is confronted by a smaller, largely inexperienced, Portuguese force. However, the Portuguese are in a strong defensive position and have good artillery support, so it may not be that easy for the Spanish to brush them aside and march on to Lisbon. (Side A = Portuguese, Side B = Spanish)

090.Coutras_a

Weary after a night march, Ann de Joyeuse' Catholic army deployed for battle with some difficulty and confusion after emerging from the Bois de Gelleterie. Meanwhile, Henri de Navarre had deployed his outnumbered Huguenots in a strong defensive position, with a marsh and river on one flank and the other protected by a park or "warren". In the centre of his position, his meagre artillery force is placed on a small mound, while the village of Coutras with its castle is to his immediate rear. (Side A = Catholics, Side B = Huguenots)

091.Coutras_b

("What if?") Enfants Perdus - A hypothetical scenario assuming that instead of fighting a pitched battle at Coutras, the two armies were both still on the march and arrived piecemeal on the battlefield from various directions at dawn. - Weary after a night march, Ann de Joyeuse' Catholic army deployed for battle with some difficulty and confusion after emerging from the Bois de Gelleterie. Meanwhile, Henri de Navarre had deployed his outnumbered Huguenots in a strong defensive position, with a marsh and river on one flank and the other protected by a park or "warren". In the centre of his position, his meager artillery force is placed on a small mound, while the village of Coutras with its castle is to his immediate rear. (Side A = Catholics, Side B = Huguenots)

092.Arques_a

The death of Henri III resulted in Henri de Navarre being recognized as king by many of his former Catholic opponents, including Montpensier, commander of the Catholic avant garde at Moncontour, and Marshal Biron. However, supported by the king of Spain, the Catholic League remained a powerful force and, at Arques, heavily outnumbered Navarre's small army, which had taken up a strong defensive position. Initially, the Catholic landsknects tricked their enemy into believing that they'd changes sides, enabling them to capture the first line of defence, but the second was to prove a tougher challenge! The early morning mist means that the Huguenot guns in Arques castle will probably only get a chance of firing towards the end of the battle. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

093.Arques_b

This hypothetical variant scenario assumes that the early morning mist clears as the battle gets under way. The death of Henri III resulted in Henri de Navarre being recognized as king by many of his former Catholic opponents, including Montpensier, commander of the Catholic avant garde at Moncontour, and Marshal Biron. However, supported by the king of Spain, the Catholic League remained a powerful force and, at Arques, heavily outnumbered Navarre's small army, which had taken up a strong defensive position. Initially, the Catholic landsknects tricked their enemy into believing that they'd changes sides, enabling them to capture the first line of defence, but the second was to prove a tougher challenge! The early morning mist means that the Huguenot guns in Arques castle will probably only get a chance of firing towards the end of the battle. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

094.Ivry_a

Although Coutras and Arques were victories for Henri de Navarre, the Catholic League was still a powerful force, retaining control of Paris and much of France. However, the battle of Ivry, fought on an open plain, would prove decisive. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

095.Ivry_b

A variant scenario with the armies starting off further apart and still arriving on the battlefield. Although Coutras and Arques were victories for Henri de Navarre, the Catholic League was still a powerful force, retaining control of Paris and much of France. However, the battle of Ivry, fought on an open plain, would prove decisive. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

096.Turnhout_a

Rather than fight the approaching Dutch army, the Spanish general, Varax, decides to avoid contact and continue his march towards Herenthals. Although the main body of Anglo-Dutch infantry are still some distance off, and so unable to participate in the action, Maurice of Nassau decides to launch an attack with his cavalry - only some 800 strong - assisted by some 300 English arquebusiers under de Vere. [Historically, this small force broke and scattered the much large Spanish force so, to give the Dutch player some chance of replicating this remarkable feat, the Spanish start off in a routed state and the cavalry charge factors have been amplified for this scenario.] (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

097.Turnhout_b

Varas stands and fights! - A "what if" variant scenario with the Spanish commander deciding to stand and fight rather than attempt to retreat. This is probably what he should have done and, for this reason, the morale of his troops is not reduced as it is in the historical scenario, where his decision to avoid contact with the enemy caused the army's morale to plummet. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

098.Nieuwpoort_a

Despite losing some 2,500 men in a disastrous previous encounter at Leffinghem bridge, the Dutch general Maurice decides to face the Spanish in open battle. The two armies are approximately equal in strength, but the Dutch have naval support. [Special Rule: Since the tide is coming in during the course of the battle, it's necessary for the troops to start moving off the beach area from 2.30pm. Any troops remaining on the beach after 4.30pm should be assumed lost - including for victory point purposes - and should take no further part in the battle.] (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

099.Nieuwpoort_b

Variant scenario using the alternative pdt. Despite losing some 2,500 men in a disastrous previous encounter at Leffinghem bridge, the Dutch general Maurice decides to face the Spanish in open battle. The two armies are approximately equal in strength, but the Dutch have naval support. [Special Rule: Since the tide is coming in during the course of the battle, it's necessary for the troops to start moving off the beach area from 2.30pm. Any troops remaining on the beach after 4.30pm should be assumed lost - including for victory point purposes - and should take no further part in the battle.] (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

100.Kokenhausen_a

The Swedish army under Gyllenhjelm have adopted a strong defensive position, with one flank resting on the Dzwina river and the other protected by a dense forest and wagons. In the centre, the Swedes have had time to strengthened a ruined farm, so it will be tougher for the enemy cavalry to overrun their guns and infantry. The Poles and allied Lithuanians will have a difficult time assaulting this position. (Side A = Swedes, Side B = Poles/Lithuanians)

101.Encounter1_French v Spanish

Encounter1 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 10,000 points worth of troops. French and Spanish Italian Wars era forces vie for control of a key river crossing and a nearby Spanish-held town.(Side A = French, Side B = Imperialist/Spanish)

102.Encounter2_French raid

Encounter2 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 10,000 points worth of troops. A French army enters the Calais pale on a raiding expedition. Even if the defences of Calais and Imperialist-held Gravelines are considered too tough to attempt to take by assault, it might still be possible for the French to inflict a lot of damage by pillaging the surrounding countryside and perhaps defeating the enemy in the field, assuming they were prepared to risk a pitched battle. (Side A = French, Side B = English and Imperialist/Spanish)

103.Encounter3_Turkish Invasion

Encounter3 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 10,000 points worth of troops. A Turkish army has penetrated as far as the Spanish Netherlands and must be defeated at all costs! (Side A = Turkish, Side B = Spanish)

104.Encounter4_Dutch Revolt

Encounter4 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 7,500 points worth of troops. Spanish and rebellious Dutch forces vie for control of a group of villages. However, inflicting a decisive defeat on the enemy army is a more important goal than merely seizing control of a few unfortified settlements. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

105.Encounter5_English v French

Encounter5 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 5,000 points worth of troops. English and French forces struggle for control of a key bridge in the vicinity of Calais. (Side A = French, Side B = English)

106.Encounter6_French v Swiss

A hypothetical scenario with each side having 10,000 points worth of troops. The French are marching towards Novara, which they're hoping to find poorly defended, but Swiss reinforcement are also approaching the town ... (Side A = French, Side B = Swiss)

107.Encounter7_Catholic v Huguenot

Encounter1 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 5,000 points worth of troops. French Catholic and Huguenot forces come to blows at Dreux. (Side A = French Catholic, Side B = Huguenots)

108.Encounter8_French in Italy

Encounter8 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 15,000 points worth of troops. An Italian League army endeavours to prevent the advancing French from gaining control of the bridges across a strategically crucial river (Side A = French/Swiss, Side B = Italians)

109.Encounter9_English v French2

Encounter9 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 5,000 points worth of troops. In this scenario - which uses the same forces as Encounter5 but on a different map - the two opposing armies are deployed facing each other in battle array at dawn. The French enjoy superiority in cavalry and artillery, but the English have more infantry, approximately half of which are archers. (Side A = French, Side B = English)

110.Encounter10_Scotland Invaded

Encounter10 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 10,000 points worth of troops. A Scottish army, supported by an allied French contingent, blocks the English advance towards Edinburgh. (Side A = Scottish & French, Side B = English)

111.Encounter11_Dutch Assault!

Encounter11 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 10,000 points worth of troops. A later 16th century Dutch army - containing a range of contingents from various other nationalities, including English, Scottish, French Huguenot, Swiss and German - advances towards a group of Spanish-controlled villages. (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)

112.Encounter12_French and Mamelukes!

Encounter12 - A hypothetical scenario with each side having 10,000 points worth of troops. The French and Mameluke armies are marching along parallel roads on either side of a river. The various bridges that span the river can be used to convey troops across to fight the enemy on his own side or, alternatively, it might be more worthwhile to remain on ones own side, either leaving the bridges guarded, or else attempting to destroy them so that they enemy can't make use of them. (Side A = French Catholic, Side B = Mameluke's)

113.Dreux_d

Variant scenario with mixed pike/shot units. Despite possessing a cavalry superiority, the Huguenots fail to conduct a proper reconnaissance of the Catholic position. Despite initial successes,the steadfastness of the Swiss hold off the Huguenot cavalry and decide the outcome. However, with a weaker cavalry force, the Catholics are unable to prevent most of the Huguenot army from getting away. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

114.St Denis_e

Mixed Weapon variant of Dandelot to the rescue! - This hypothetical scenario assumes that Dandelot's troops arrive in time for the battle rather than the following day. Although the Huguenots are still outnumbered 2:1, many of the Catholics are untrained and ill-equipped Parisian militia. Pitching camp at St Denis, the Huguenots have decided to blockade Paris itself. However, instead of remaining inactive inside the city walls, the Catholics under Montmorency decide on a sortie against the numerically inferior Huguenots before their reinforcements can arrive. The battle opens at the point where the Catholic cavalry are attempting to outflank the Huguenots and run into the entrenched arquebusiers on the flanks. (Side A = Catholics, Side B = Huguenots)

115.Jarnac_b

Jarnac - Variant scenario with mixed pike/shot units. Outnumbered and outmanoeuvred, Coligny deploys his Huguenots in front of the Guirlande, a marshy rivulet, and with the river Charente protecting his right flank and the village of Triac on his left. In this defensive position, he hopes to hold off the Catholic army until Conde can arrive from Cognac with reinforcements. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

116.Moncontour_d

Moncontour 1569 - Variant scenario with mixed pike/shot units. Facing superior number, as usual, the Huguenot leader Coligny was reluctant to attack. Meanwhile, the Catholic general Tavannes, who had failed to properly exploit his success at Jarnac earlier in the year, took his time bringing his army into action, providing the Huguenot guns with a good opportunity to inflict heavy casualties on Montpensier's cavalry. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

117.Coutras_c

Coutras - Variant scenario with mixed pike/shot units. Weary after a night march, Ann de Joyeuse' Catholic army deployed for battle with some difficulty and confusion after emerging from the Bois de Gelleterie. Meanwhile, Henri de Navarre had deployed his outnumbered Huguenots in a strong defensive position, with a marsh and river on one flank and the other protected by a park or "warren". In the centre of his position, his meagre artillery force is placed on a small mound, while the village of Coutras with its castle is to his immediate rear. (Side A = Catholics, Side B = Huguenots)

118.Arques_c

Arques - Variant scenario with mixed pike/shot units. The death of Henri III resulted in Henri de Navarre being recognized as king by many of his former Catholic opponents, including Montpensier, commander of the Catholic avant garde at Moncontour, and Marshal Biron. However, supported by the king of Spain, the Catholic League remained a powerful force and, at Arques, heavily outnumbered Navarre's small army, which had taken up a strong defensive position. Initially, the Catholic landsknects tricked their enemy into believing that they'd changes sides, enabling them to capture the first line of defence, but the second was to prove a tougher challenge! The early morning mist means that the Huguenot guns in Arques castle will probably only get a chance of firing towards the end of the battle. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

119.Ivry_c

Ivry, 14 March 1590 - Variant scenario with mixed pike/shot units. Although Coutras and Arques were victories for Henri de Navarre, the Catholic League was still a powerful force, retaining control of Paris and much of France. However, the battle of Ivry, fought on an open plain, would prove decisive. (Side A = Catholics/Swiss, Side B = Huguenots)

124.Gemblours_d

Gemblours - Variant of scenario 087.Gemblours_b with mixed pike/shot units and the French Huguenot and Anglo-Scottish contingents on the Dutch side represented as independent forces. This scenario starts before the Dutch make their disastrous decision to retreat. Perhaps they should stand and fight a pitched battle on favourable ground, or even attempt to outmanoeuvre the Spanish and try to capture Namurs? (This was in fact their objective until they found out about the Spanish reinforcements) The two armies are approximately equal in size, so if the troops are handled astutely, there should be a good chance of either side securing a decisive victory. (Side A = Dutch/French/Scottish, Side B = Spanish)

126.Nieuwpoort_c

Nieuwpoort 1600 - Variant scenario with mixed pike/shot units. Despite losing some 2,500 men in a disastrous previous encounter at Leffinghem bridge, the Dutch general Maurice decides to face the Spanish in open battle. The two armies are approximately equal in strength, but the Dutch have naval support. [Special Rule: Since the tide is coming in during the course of the battle, it's necessary for the troops to start moving off the beach area from 2.30pm. Any troops remaining on the beach after 4.30pm should be assumed lost - including for victory point purposes - and should take no further part in the battle.] (Side A = Dutch, Side B = Spanish)


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